Soul-Care Articles: Christ-centered, Spirit-led, Biblically-based, Clinically-sound, Truth-oriented

Posts tagged ‘impatience’

Are you waiting for God?

SOURCE:  Ron Edmondson

Wait for the Lord.  Be strong and take heart and wait for the Lord! Psalm 27:14 NIV

I know what some of you are thinking, and quite frankly, I understand…

Sometimes I get tired of waiting as well…

You’ve been waiting so long already…

When is your turn?

Sometimes I find myself in another one of these trying times, when it seems I can’t win for losing…I have my daily pity party…curse the day I was born…and wish the world would let me off the rotation for a while.

Maybe it’s not always that bad, but to be honest, sometimes I get impatient waiting for God to act!

Several times throughout the Psalms, the psalmist cries out “Come quickly, Lord!” I can identify with the writer.

I want God to act on my timing. Sometimes…just to be honest…I can’t understand why God hasn’t responded to my pleas for help! NOW always seems like a good time to me!

Now, please, don’t leave me out on an island alone… surely you’ve been there too! We have a hard time waiting for God to work His perfect will! It’s just hard to see how the present situation could ever turn out perfectly.

Then I remember that God is longing to be gracious to me, that His ways are not my ways, that His thoughts are higher than my thoughts, that His plans for me are just and righteous. I recall that He loved me and planned victory for me before there was time, and that He sees tomorrow, before it is yesterday…or even today. He is God. He does not deal in issues of time. His ways are in elements of eternity. His view is from above; He sees the beginning and the end.

I know He has my best at heart. I am strengthened for another day. I can go on because I’m reminded of His love!

I will wait for the Lord!

Will you?

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Waiting on God

SOURCE:  Andrew Murray/Discipleship Journal

“Rest in the Lord, and wait patiently for Him. . . . Those that wait upon the Lord, they shall inherit the land.”  Psalm 37:7, 9

“In patience possess your souls.” “Ye have need of patience.” “Let patience have its perfect work, that ye may be perfect and entire.”

Such words of the Holy Spirit show us what an important element in the Christian life and character patience is. And nowhere is there a better place for cultivating or displaying it than in waiting on God. There we discover how impatient we are, and what our impatience means.

We confess at times that we are impatient with men and circumstances that hinder us, or with ourselves and our slow progress in the Christian life. If we truly set ourselves to wait upon God, we shall find that it is with Him we are impatient, because He does not at once, or as soon as we could wish, do our bidding. It is in waiting upon God that our eyes are opened to believe in His wise and sovereign will, and to see that the sooner and the more completely we yield absolutely to it, the more surely His blessing can come to us.

“It is not of him that willeth, nor of him that runneth, but of God that showeth mercy.”

We have as little power to increase or strengthen our spiritual life, as we had to originate it. We “were born not of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of the will of God.” Even so, our willing and running, our desire and effort, avail nought; all is “of God that showeth mercy.”

All the exercises of the spiritual life, our reading and prayer, our willing and doing, have their very great value. But they can go no farther than this, that they point the way and prepare us in humility to look to and depend upon God Himself, and in patience to wait His good time and mercy.

The waiting is to teach us our absolute dependence upon God’s mighty working, and to make us in perfect patience place ourselves at His disposal. They that wait on the Lord shall inherit the land; the promised land and its blessing. The heirs must wait; they can afford to wait.

“Rest in the Lord, and wait patiently for him.”

The margin gives for “Rest in the Lord,” “Be silent to the Lord,” or “Be still before the Lord” (ASV ). It is resting in the Lord, in His will, His promise, His faithfulness, and His love, that makes patience easy. And the resting in Him is nothing but being silent unto Him, still before Him. Having our thoughts and wishes, our fears and hopes, hushed into calm and quiet in that great peace of God which passes all understanding. That peace keeps the heart and mind when we are anxious for anything, because we have made our request known to Him. The rest, the silence, the stillness, and the patient waiting, all find their strength and joy in God Himself.

The need for patience, and the reasonableness, and blessedness of patience will be opened up to the waiting soul. Our patience will be seen to be the counterpart of God’s patience. He longs far more to bless us fully than we can desire it. But as the husbandman has long patience till the fruit be ripe, so God bows Himself to our slowness and bears long with us. Let us remember this, and wait patiently.

Of each promise and every answer to prayer the Word is true: “I the Lord will hasten it in its time.”

“Rest in the Lord, and wait patiently for him.” Yes, for Him. Seek not only the help, the gift, seek Himself; wait for Him. Give God His glory by resting in Him, by trusting Him fully, by waiting patiently for Him.

This patience honors Him greatly; it leaves Him, as God on the throne, to do His work; it yields self wholly into His hands. It lets God be God. If your waiting be for some special request, wait patiently. If your waiting be more the exercise of the spiritual life seeking to know and have more of God, wait patiently. Whether it be in the shorter specific periods of waiting, or as the continuous habit of the soul, rest in the Lord, be still before the Lord, and wait patiently. “They that wait on the Lord shall inherit the land.”

My soul, wait thou only upon God.

Being Patient Learning Patience With Challenging People

SOURCE:  Counseling Solutions

And we urge you, brothers, admonish the idle, encourage the fainthearted, help the weak, be patient with them all. –1 Thessalonians 5:14 (ESV)

The main part of this verse is the last part, which is no doubt the hardest part. While the idle, the fainthearted, and the weak cover three categories of people we could possibly struggle with, the phrase Paul puts on the end of his sentence is the real challenge.

The idle, fainthearted, and the weak do not particularly bother me all that much unless you’re asking me to be patient with them. Paul puts three difficult people-types into one big basket and then says that you and I are to be patient with all three of them.

And who are these people I am to be patient with?

The Idle – these are the people who are not living the way they should. They are unruly, out-of-order, not walking according to the clear teaching of God’s Word. They know better because they are Christians, but are choosing to do their own thing. Paul says we are to warn them.

The Fainthearted – these are the people with “small souls.” They have limitations that are not altogether character related. Everybody does not possess a 95 mile-per-hour fast ball. There are people in our relational sphere who have certain limitations. Paul asks us to encourage the small souled people in our world.

The Weak – These are the people who are easily tempted toward certain sins. While they may be strong in most areas, there are some temptations that are particularly acute to them. And though they are seeking to fight a good fight against these temptations, Paul’s hope is that we will be extra mindful of our co-laborers by seeking to help them.

And what should be my heart attitude toward these people?

Though there may be three categories of people in your world, there is one common thread that binds them together as far as your heart attitude and response to them. That there is only one common denominator is the good news. The bad news is that the common denominator is be patient with them all.

Here is a guiding truth that I try, though not always successfully, to apply to my heart when I am serving someone who is different than I am and needs to change:

The few things that I have learned in 50 years of living and have somewhat successfully applied to my life, I must not self-righteously expect, demand, or impose that others learn similar things in six days or six months.

A sober assessment of myself and how I have responded to God and eventually changed through years of trying, failing, trying, and succeeding helps me to moderate my heart down to the necessary levels of patience when it comes to working with other people.

Let’s face it: neither you nor I was quick to change in every area of sanctification. And if the truth were known, we’d have to admit that there are still areas of our lives that need to improve. Can we be honest on this one? Therefore, I want to be careful about how I think about someone who is not changing according to my expectations, preferences, or desires.

Being patient with the idle – as you examine the unruly areas of my life, please do not refrain from speaking into my life. I only ask that you be patient with me as you help me to grow into Christ-likeness.

Being patient with the fainthearted – I have certain limitations. However, I do not want to make excuses for sin, therefore I need you to help me discern the differences between God-given limitations that I can’t go beyond and character issues that I may be able to change. This process of discerning these differences will require much patience on your part.

Being patient with the weak – while there are many things in this world that are not tempting to me and I am grateful for the grace God has given to me in each of these areas, there are still areas where I am weak. I struggle with specific and real sin issues. I need your help. And how can you help me? Primarily by being patient with me when I fail and even more patient as you walk me through the reconciliation process with those I have offended because of my failure.

My Impatient Indicators

When I am losing patience with a person there are “indicators” that I feel in my heart and sometimes express through my actions that alert me that I am either sinning against someone or about to sin against someone. Here is my personal short list of sins that manifest in my heart and sometimes expressed through my behavior: impatience, frustration, anger, criticalness, gossip, slander, harshness, not thinking the best of, hopelessness, worry, angst, unkindness, not serving them, demanding, judgmental, and anxious.

It’s pretty straight forward:

And we urge you, brothers, admonish the idle, encourage the fainthearted, help the weak, be patient with them all. –1 Thessalonians 5:14 (ESV)

HOW L-O-N-G, LORD?

SOURCE–Adapted from:  Stepping Stones/Lighthouse Network

Transformational Thought

Have you ever said those words, “How long?” As in, “How long, Lord, until my prayer is answered? How long until life gets better? How long do You want me to do this without seeing results? How long do You want me to suffer? How long do I have to ‘just hang in there?’ How long ’til my kids get along? How long ’til my loved one stops drinking?”

When Joseph was sold into slavery and later spent years in prison, he must have asked, “How long, Lord?” When Moses led the Israelites around and around in the wilderness, he surely thought, “How long, Lord?” When Noah was ridiculed for 100 years while he built an ark on dry land, he must have wondered, “How long, Lord?” The Israelites have been wondering for centuries, “How long until the Messiah comes?” But each one of these trusted God. They respected Him enough to continue obeying Him even when it seemed that all hope was gone.

Perhaps you are involved in a ministry that seems to go nowhere. Yet, you know the Lord wants you there. Maybe you have been praying for an unsaved loved one for many years. Or perhaps you have a business that just doesn’t come together, but the Lord has led you to continue. Be encouraged to revere God by continuing to obey him, even though you may wonder, “How long, Lord?”

Our nature is to want our agenda now. No waiting. Nobody else calls the shots. We avoid discomfort, and demand what we want when we want it. My kingdom come, my will be done. But waiting and patience are powerful teachers of many truths. This is how character and many psychological skills are developed. God knows the right timing. Bend to His timeline and your peace and growth will be unbelievable.

Today, be confident that God loves you. Examine your life to see what situation or area makes you impatient … frustrated … irritable. Make sure you are doing a good job with your part of the issue. Then accept that God has a different timeline than you do. Learn the lesson He is teaching. The situation is in your life to grow you … that is God’s purpose for all that comes into your life. He has a perfect plan for us. We (and others) just keep messing it up. His timing is always perfect because it is His timing. As Noah did, keep on “doing all that God commands.”

Prayer

Oh Father, Lord, help me honor You by trusting You and being willing to wait on You. Even though I get discouraged at times, help me remember that You are in control and that Your way is the best way. Your timing is the best timing. Help me be patient so I can show the world I am willing to wait on You, Lord. Thy kingdom come, not my kingdom come. I really don’t want to take over responsibility for the whole world, even though sometimes I act like it. I pray this and all prayers for the one who demonstrated perfect timing, Jesus Christ;  AMEN!

The Truth

I patiently waited, LORD, for you to hear my prayer. You listened and pulled me from a lonely pit full of mud and mire. You let me stand on a rock with my feet firm, and you gave me a new song, a song of praise to you. Many will see this, and they will honor and trust you, the LORD God.

Psalm 40:1-3

Therefore, since we have been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ. Through Him we have also obtained access by faith into this grace in which we stand, and we rejoice in hope of the glory of God. More than that, we rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope, and hope does not put us to shame, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit who has been given to us.

Romans 5:1-5

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